Perioral Dermatitis

Perioral dermatitis (rosaceiform dermatitis) is the name given to an inflammatory, acne-like skin condition that is similar to rosacea. In most cases it occurs around the mouth (perioral), and less often also around the eyes (periorbital). Characteristic symptoms are reddened papules which often do not itch, they though sometimes smart or cause stabbing pains, and which can join together to form extensive areas of inflammation. Festering blisters or pustules also form.

Perioral dermatitis

Perioral dermatitis

It is a condition which mostly affects women. Subjective symptoms such as itching, smarting, stabbing pains and a feeling of skin tautness may be only slight or very severe. The cause of the illness is unknown. Cases are sometimes observed after local or systematic treatment with cortisone. However, even in the case of systematic cortisone application, perioral dermatitis is always restricted to the facial area.

For treatment, wet-cream compresses are used. This means that compresses soaked in black tea are applied onto a coating of well-tolerated lipid cream. The cold caused by the moisture evaporation already reduces the intensity of the inflammation. Black tea also contains soothing and inflammation-inhibiting substances. Mixed ointments with metronidazol or erythromycin, i.e. anti-bacterial substances, are used for local treatment. In severer attacks of festering papules and pustules, antibiotics such as minocyclin, doxycyclin or tetracyclin may be given orally. In many cases, the illness is a recurring one. As the skin remains easily irritable for many weeks, follow-up treatment with basic skin care creams is recommended before normal care products and cosmetics can be safely used.